InsideAR Tokyo 2014: From Wearable 3-D Sensors to turning the world into a TouchScreen

July 24, 2014

InsideAR Tokyo - the 2nd edition – is over and has been a huge success for us. We thank all participants and partners from Cybernet, Intel, Canon, Epson, Fujitsu, Erba Holdings and Vuzix! This year we invited a diverse group of exhibitors, which we believe are of high interest for Japanese customers.
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Over 300 guests from 192 companies joined us to be in the center of AR innovations; we saw huge interest from a very diverse groups of participants – from  3D designers to app developers to  large players who have been  developing their own AR algorithms for over a decade now and looking into utilizing AR for high-accuracy industrial applications. Most importantly, the Gurus of AR and MR joined us on stage to share their knowledge, their success stories and collaboratively discuss the path of AR development for the upcoming year.

2nd edition rocked: InsideAR Tokyo tripled its attendees

InsideAR has a format of an open conference and everyone is invited to present their vision on the technology and exhibit their innovations. We hope you enjoyed the live demonstrations, workshops, and were -most importantly-  inspired by the speeches from the leaders of the industry: Prof. Kato, Canon, Intel, Epson, Fujitsu, Erba Holdings, Vuzix, and many more who contributed to making this conference bigger than last year: we are proud of tripling the number of attendees and doubling the amount of speakers.

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Best feedback from our guests in the visitor’s survey!

 

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Wearable 3D Sensors are the most driving innovation in the AR field, today. Augmented Reality on Head-Mounted-Displays was one of the main topics on the agenda. It was, represented by renowned manufacturers, such as Epson (who teamed up with Mitsubishi to demonstrate the AR Maintenance scenario on the Aircon unit) and Vuzix, but also by the new players in the field, as Brillianservice (Mirama Glass with gesture control) and Westunitis (ultralight inforod glass aimed for industrial tasks). Metaio also showcased scenarios on Google Glass.
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R&D insights

Turning the whole world into a touchscreen could be realized by a visionary approach from Metaio’s R&D Labs. The Thermal Touch is a patented future method of triggering AR on a selected object. RGB sensors combined with an infrared camera help to register a person’s heat signature on any surface and then combine it with Metaio’s AR software.

However, it was not all about wearables. From Intel, Canon, Fujitsu and NGrain we received insights on Industrial AR approaches used today, and were excited by all the possibilities.

The workshop presentations are available to download on our website.

 


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And what says the team?

Here is some feedback from our team members who helped organise the conference this year:

Dr. Irina Gusakova, Senior Product Sales Manager:

“We were very pleased to see so many new corporations joining us for InsideAR Tokyo this year – united in our goal to make the Japanese AR segment bigger and better. Metaio has a very strong relationship with its Eco-system in Japan, as it has always been one of the top markets for our company, and we like to believe that our customers would say the same about Metaio. Japan became a new home for Junaio, a broad circle of local developers here brought to life some of the most successful campaigns, such as Penguin Navi or Starbucks. This is a very positive sign for us, it means we are doing a good job, and are appreciated by both our developers and users.

We received very positive feedback around the conference and the current trend makes us believe that 2015 we will meet you all again in Tokyo!”

Matthias Greiner, Senior Business Development Manager Junaio:

“It was a great experience to visit Tokyo and insideAR 2014  this year. Being in one of the most exciting cities in the world, having interesting discussions with AR specialists from all over Asia, getting in touch with impressive technology demos and, of course, the delicious Japanese food has made insideAR 2014 a great happening. Japan is one of the most interesting and fastest growing AR markets today. It was amazing to talk to local developers and technology providers and having the chance to learn about their current and future AR projects.”

Thomas Berton,Software Engineer

“InsideAR Tokyo 2014 was,in my opinion,. a very successful event. This was made possible Not only because we had great speakers but also because our  guests  were very interested in the technology. We can definitely see that wearables are one of the next generation of devices that are promoting Augmented Reality. I was personally impressed by the number of wearables that are now available on the market, all of them having their own special customization. Amazing!”

Sudhanshu Kapoor, Business Development Manager OEMs:

“When they first told me that I was going to be on a plane to Tokyo next week, I was the happiest person on the planet. It has always been a dream of mine to go to Japan – I not only wanted to witness the Japanese hi-tech world but also wanted to present my hi-tech solutions to them. Fortunately,  “insideAR Tokyo 2014”  was a great success- we got such a great and warm response from the visitors. It was a busy and exciting time I had no time to even take a coffee break OR click a few pictures. I was asked so many sincerely technical questions from our Japanese visitors, that not only showed their affection towards Augmented Reality, but also the growing awareness of it among developers, and hi-tech enthusiasts.

As I drive Metaio´s hardware IP division – primarily promoting and licensing our AREngine to  chipset OEMs-  it was very impressive to see that the visitors really acknowledged such need of having HW acceleration to enable “Always ON, Always Augmented” scenarios. All in all, it was a great trip to Japan – InsideAR, Japanese hospitality, amazing vegetarian food, well managed transport, respect towards rules, their culture, warmness,…. and what not. Looking forward to being there again for much longer time now!”

We are happy that all our guests made it an unforgettable event! See you in Japan next year for the 3rd edition of InsideAR Tokyo! 

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A guestpost by Dr. Irina Gusakova


Metaio at the Wearable Technology Conference, San Francisco

July 21, 2014

We’re driving fast in my car and we just want to have fun.

Our own Amanda Le introducing some of the biggest names in Wearable Technology

Our own Amanda Le introducing some of the biggest names in Wearable Technology

wearable tech conference

The ladies of Metaio ready for anything.

Earlier this month, the Wearable Technologies Conference broke ground on its first event in San Francisco at Fort Mason. As the leading provider of augmented reality software for wearable technology, Metaio joined dozens of industry-leading wearable technology companies to show off some of the latest innovations. From fully immersive, first-person drone rides with ZEISS to hands-all motion with the newest Leap Motion controls, the conference boasted some incredible talks with industry leaders from around the world with our own Amanda Le making many of their introductions. According to Amanda, “the Wearable Tech Conference had an amazing lineup of speakers that expanded the horizon for what constitutes a wearable and brought up issues that many neglect such as form factor, security, and alternative energy sources.” The lineup included some of the greatest industry leaders in wearable technologies including Babak Parviz of Google X, David Holz of Leap Motion, and John Dwyen of Flextronics.

While we’d love to talk about all the cool technologies showcased at the conference, one product that caught our eye in particular was the Evena Eyes-On™ Glasses system. The glasses are used to detect the veins in the body by switching between different types of vision to help nurses during patient check ups. Definitely check out their website and product video to witness some amazing augmented reality!

However, the conference wasn’t all business. True to the organization’s German roots, the conference’s lunch break of the first day featured a most exciting show: the Brazil vs. Germany World Cup match. With a 7-1 finish in Germany’s favor, the conference mixed a little business with pleasure. Who says wearable technology and sports can’t mix?

Miss out on all the fun? The Wearable Technologies website has an overview of Day 1 and Day 2 of the San Francisco conference. You can also sign up for the next Wearable Technologies Conference in Taipei coming in October. We’ll see you next year!


Weekest Links – Early July

July 7, 2014

Did you augmented your 4th with some fiARworks?

Augmented Reality in the Age of Wearables

Mr. Scully speaking on a panel of experts about the future of augmented reality.

Metaio | Junaio Recap

AR Toys Competition Jury Member #4: Introducing Pati Keilwerth [Augmented Blog]

Augmented Reality Makes Us More Human, Not Less [Tom's Guide]

Augmented Reality Made Easy – Webinar [PaperSpecs]

Augmented Reality News

Holographic optic could revolutionise augmented reality (and even works in 3D) [Stuff]

Head-up Displays: Technologies and Global Markets [Digital Journal]

The Top 5 Most Useful Augmented Reality Apps [Bidness Etc]

Oculus suspends Rift sales in China after “extreme” reselling [Vizworld]

Speck Design Collaborates with Google on Project Tango Tablet [MarketWatch]

Google’s Project Tango Could Define The Future of Augmented Reality [Benzinga]

R Security Uses Augmented Reality Video and Click to Call Through Engage Mobility to Promote Residential Protect America Security [MarketWatch]

K-Glass to be unveiled in 2015 [The Korea Herald]

Shining a light on the past: ‘Virtual Reality’ torch project missing fragments on to ancient treasures, restoring them to their former glory [Daily Mail Online]

Mobility’s Promise [Energy Biz]

Drakerz-Confrontation augmented-reality card game launches in the U.S. [VentureBeat]

Google Glass’s Thad Starner Wears the Future [IEEE Spectrum]

Enriching the User Experience with Augmented Reality Technology [Strawberry Hill]

Please DO Touch the Dinosaurs at the Natural History Museum [Smithsonian.com]

Scottish government uses augmented reality in campaign against second-hand smoke [The Drum]

FDA clearance for augmented reality device lets surgeons see each critical step before they make it [MedCity News]

Upcoming Events

Webinar – Metaio Creative: Interactive AR [Sign Up Here]

InsideAR Tokyo – July 8th [Program Info]

Wearable Technologies Conference, July 8th – 9th [Register Here]

Pick of the Week

A major difference between augmented reality and virtual reality is that augmented reality inherently has you interact with the real world while virtual reality seeks to immerse you in an entirely different reality. A panel about augmented reality and wearable computing at New York’s CE Week 2014 explored some arguments for (and against) a future embracing augmented reality. Check out the panel session below and be sure to read the article Augmented Reality Makes Us More Human, Not Less for more information.


So long, and thanks for all the Augmented Reality.

June 27, 2014

I remember the first time I saw it.

Almost 5 years ago Brendan Scully walked into my room in the house we shared in college. I was trying desperately at the time to devise a most insidiously clever first tweet, which as I recall was something along the lines of “destabilize the discourse” (though Twitter itself belies these memories, I can assure you that was the original). Rudely, Brendan interrupted my most-important mission, demanding my attention.

“Trak. Trak.”

“…”

“TRAK.”

“…”

“TRAAAAAAAAAA-”

“What?!”

AugmentedReality.”

(Interestingly enough, this would later become Brendan’s chosen icebreaker for nearly any conversation or situation. Standing in line in 2011 for what was to be a godawful post-WWDC party at the Roe, Brendan once proposed that we run up and down said line shouting, “AUGMENTED REALITY,” to “see what happens”.)

Brendan ushered me into his room, where he took print-out of a funny-looking bar code and displayed it in front of the webcam of his computer, only to have the object burst into a multi-colored 3-D animation of varying sizes of geometric shapes.

By today’s standards, the frame-rate was intolerable; the latency was more than noticeable.

It was beautiful.

That one moment was the first in a series of events that led myself (along with Brendan) to join Metaio. This was, in retrospect, not the first time I encountered AR: Bladerunner, Terminator, Predator, Minority Report, Iron Man, comics, science fiction novels, video games; as a society we had always manifested our dreams for technology in popular culture. And we will never lose sight of those dreams and expectations- it’s only a matter of time.

But in that moment, sitting in the only flat-roofed house in New Hampshire in a poorly-lighted room, the glow of the monitor illuminating our grinning faces in the graininess of the camera view, I saw the future.

And I wanted to be part of it.

That is why it is with heaviness of heart that I announce that I am leaving Metaio. The last three years have been nothing short of wondrous. But in the spirit of this blog, and because I said I was going to do it, I will now interview myself.

Where are you going?!

I am going to Google, where I will join the Waze team. More on this later, but I can tell you that position doesn’t have anything to do with augmented reality.

Are you done with AR?

Not in the least. I still hold a childlike fascination for the magic of computer vision, and just because I’m moving on doesn’t mean I won’t stop writing about it, either. In fact, depending on my schedule I will still try to write about technology, including AR, in my blog that I literally just started today. Please feel free to keep up with me there, as well as LinkedIn and Twitter.

from Brendan: Is Humanity ready for AR? 

I would counter that question with “Is AR ready for humanity?” It’s the decathlon of technologies, and it takes years of training for a human to run a decathlon. That being said, technology is only going to improve, so expect in the next few years to watch former barriers crumble beneath the might of optimization. I know for a fact you’re going to see some great things from Metaio in the very near future.

What was your favorite part about working for Metaio?

(Other than every InsideAR and AWE ever) Four things:

1) The Team

2) The Technology

3) Traveling

4) Talking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For anyone considering working in Augmented Reality, you really can’t get better than Metaio. I have been so fortunate to work at a company full of such fun, passionate and determined individuals. I have traveled all over the world with them, and many will be lifelong friends.

To all of you I’ve met along the way, It’s been a blast.

To the Metaio Team- you all know who you are, and you’re the best. I know that I would not have been able to accomplish anything in the last three years without your support.

To Augmented Reality- don’t think I’m done with you yet.

 

 

 


Weekest Links – End of June

June 23, 2014

Tensions are high in the San Francisco office as USMNT pits off against Germany this week. Tears will shed, blood will boil, and friendships will break as the future of Group G will be decided this fateful Thursday.

Courtesy of Bloomberg TV

Courtesy of Bloomberg TV

Metaio | Junaio recap

See Asbury Park through augmented reality [App.com]

ARchive LAPL – Augmented Education [Augmented Blog]

Featured Channel: Aiguamolls Emporà – Mira què s’amage by DaH! [Junaio Blog]

Wearables Get a New Interface [EE Times]

Augmented Reality Usage – Student Survey [Augmented Blog]

Metaio is Bringing Interactivity to Every Surface [The Gadget Flow]

Augmented Reality News

Podcast Episode 40: AWE2014 Recap with Ori Inbar [AR Dirt]

Wiless Controls Inc. Acquires Next Galaxy [The Wall Street Journal]

How Technologies are Likely to Fare this Year [DataQuest]

Toronto Condo Project Uses Augmented Reality To Reach Global Buyers [Opp Connect]

Revenue generation through AR on a positive rise [Exchange 4 Media]

Google Glass goes on sale in the UK for £1,000 [Engadget]

The CNN10 Inventions: Skully [KSPR]

The Future As We See It [U of T Magazine]

Artist Turns Mondrian Works into Augmented Reality Paintings [Artnet News]

Virtual Surgery: The Operating Room Goes High-Tech [Bloomberg TV]

Wearable Technology Will Be Big In The Business World, Says Salesforce [Mobile Commerce Press]

Testing Technology: How Augmented Reality Helps Museum Visitors Appreciate Paintings [University of Chicago]

Augmented Reality Tablet Enables Designers To Sketch In 3D [Mobile Commerce Press]

Wearable Tech Is Bigger Among Developers Than Consumers [Mobile Commerce Press]

Epson’s smart glasses do AR better than Google Glass [ITBusiness.ca]

Augmented reality application released to App Store [Solid Thinking Interactive]

Upcoming Events

Webinar - Location Based Channels [Register Here]

Wearable Technologies Conference 2014, July 8 – 9 [Register Here]

InsideAR Tokyo, July 8th [Register Here]

Pick of the Week

When it comes to surgery, future wearable devices paired with augmented reality could change the way operating rooms are managed. Recently, Bloomberg interviewed Dr. Selene Parekh, one of the earliest adopters of Google Glass in surgery, who gives his thoughts about how Google Glass can be used in hospitals. Check out the video below to see what he thinks the future of health care could be with Google Glass.


Metaio Reaches 100,000 Developers

June 11, 2014

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That’s a big Twinkie

In 2011 Metaio’s CEO Thomas Alt dubbed 2014 to be the year that augmented reality would exist on every smartphone, and so far it has been an incredibly exciting year turning that statement into a reality. Between wearable-ready augmented reality softwareAR browser interoperability, and new technologies such as 3-D Spacial Occlusion and Thermal Touch, Metaio has been making waves in all aspects of the augmented reality industry. Today, we’re happy to share a new milestone: the Metaio developer community has grown to over 100,000 developers! We’re incredibly grateful to our community for being such an integral part in pushing us toward our dream of always on, always augmented.

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How much will we grow in the future?

When Metaio released a free version of the Mobile SDK at the end of 2011, it was a major turn for the developer community. Suddenly, anyone could use Metaio’s augmented reality platform. Less than a year later, we deployed the Augmented Reality Experience Language to make the SDK available for development on multiple platforms including Android, iOS, and Windows PC. The combination of a cross-platform, free for everyone SDK was ground-breaking and by June of 2013 we had over 50,000 developers using the Metaio platform, and now, within one year, Metaio doubled its developer community. Such growth in a community stands as a testament to the technology behind the Metaio platform and the growing innovation that powers the augmented reality industry. With companies such as Facebook and Google making major purchases to get ahead in the computer vision race, augmented reality stands as an industry that will help shape the future.

Thomas AWE Big Visions

Thomas Alt presenting Big Visions at AWE 2014

Here at Metaio we like to pursue augmented reality technologies and advancements not just for augmented reality’s sake, but to make augmented reality an indispensable tool that developers can leverage for their solutions, as Thomas Alt said at the closing of this year’s AWE, “don’t promote apps as augmented reality apps, do useful apps which leverage augmented reality.” This is one of the reasons why the Metaio platform is the most diverse, multi-functional augmented reality platform available. With the newest augmented reality R&D pushed straight out to the developer community (after some polishing of course) and a constantly evolving technology platform that encompasses both hardware and software, the Metaio platform has the widest variety of tools available for developers. As the only platform to offer edge-based tracking, point cloud tracking, an internal renderer, gravity alignment, and extended tracking along with support for Unity and other proprietary rendering engines, SLAM tracking, and several additional features available on the SDK and other supporting and/or independent software solutions such as the Metaio Creator and Continuous Visual Search, Metaio is the true innovative leader in augmented reality.

But this milestone could not have been achieved without the some of the most important people in the AR community: our developers. We’d like to extend our thanks and congratulations to our entire community; we couldn’t have reached this milestone without your dedication to make the Metaio community the most diverse, successful AR community in the world. Thanks everyone! We look forward to pushing the boundaries of augmented reality technology!

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Metaio at the Augmented World Expo 2014

June 5, 2014

Last week was the Augmented World Expo and of course Metaio showed up in full force. Here’s a brief overview of everything that happened during the expo.

The Expo Floor

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Trak Lord checks the Google Glass Audi Engine demo. Yes, that is Audi A3 on the Expo floor. No, we didn’t get to drive it around. . . too much. ;)

This year Metaio brought a full range of augmented reality demonstrations ranging from Edge-Based tracking on Google Glass and Moverio BT-200s, to Interactive Print demos with the Metaio Creator and various product catalogs from vendors such as IKEA, and the latest from Metaio’s R&D department: facial reconstruction, 3-D Spacial Occlusion and Thermal Touch. Booth visitors got a chance to try each of these demos hand-on while Metaio’s partner companies Epson, Intel, NGRAIN, Nod Inc., Occipital, and Vuzix also made a good showing with their own augmented reality technologies.

Metaio Wins an Auggie Award!

Auggie Award

Such an amazing award to bring home!

In 2012, Metaio won an Auggie Award for Best Demo with 3-D tracking. Since then, the Auggies have expanded their the awards to include a variety of categories and the quality of submissions has become even more competitive than before. This year we’re happy to say that Metaio won the Auggie Award for Best Augmented Reality Campaign with the IKEA catalog app. Already a well-known augmented reality application, the IKEA catalog app boasts several milestones including Most Downloaded Branded App in 2012 (despite being on the market for only 6 months) and over 1 million placements of virtual furniture across the globe. We’re incredibly humbled to win such a prestigious award against some amazing augmented reality apps. Be sure to visit the AWE Auggie Awards page to see the finalists and winners for the other Auggie Awards.

Talks, Interviews, and Information Sessions

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Thomas Alt and Brian Mullins close AWE with some final thoughts.

No AWE  experience is complete without a few words from the most innovative minds in the augmented reality industry. Metaio’s CEO Thomas Alt, Head of Marketing Trak Lord, Brendan Scully, and Ryan Burgoyne each presented Metaio technologies across a range of topics. Check out the videos listed below or visit the AWE YouTube page to see all the presentations during this year’s AWE.

Deepdive for metaio SDK by Ryan Burgoyne

Ryan Burgoyne – Metaio SDK for Wearables at AWE 2014

AWE.tv Floor Demo with Trak Lord, Metaio

Trak Lord (Metaio) – 3D Cameras and Augmented Reality at AWE 2014

AWE.tv Interview with Thomas Alt & Brendan Scully, Metaio

Thomas Alt (CEO, Metaio) – Big Visions for the Interactive World - at AWE 2014

Thomas Alt (CEO, Metaio) – Automotive is Driving AR at AWE 2014

AWE 2014 Closing Panel: Future Opportunities in the Augmented World

In Closing

As always, AWE was an amazing experience and we had a great time showcasing the most advanced augmented reality software. In case you missed a chance to visit our booth at AWE, Metaio will be at ISMAR 2014 in Munich and will be hosting InsideAR at Beijing, Tokyo, and Munich.We hope you all enjoyed AWE, and we’ll see you next year!

 

A family that augments together, stays together

A family that augments together, stays together.


Thermal Touch: The Future of Wearable User Interfaces

June 3, 2014

GAL-thermal-touch-004Have you ever worn a wearable headset? Have you tried Google Glass or any of its myriad competitors? After the initial (and deserved) sense of wonder and awe wore off from perceiving digital and virtual content overlaid on the real world, have you found yourself strangely frustrated at just using the device itself?

You wouldn’t be alone – smartphone companies (Apple chiefly among them) have labored diligently to irrevocably addict you to touchscreens and touch interfaces. Not unkindly, touchscreens have largely replaced mobile keyboards and are largely to thank for the meteoric rise and massive adaptation of smart devices. But insidiously secreted away amid marketing language and shiny rectangles is the sentiment that gestures like “pinch-to-zoom” and “swiping” are only natural- if not pure instinct.  GAL-thermal-touch-003

Imagine an iPhone- without a touchscreen. Imagine a tablet, and no amount of swiping or pinching will allow you to manipulate its contents. This is the reality of wearable computing and augmented reality devices – they’ve removed the necessity of touch. But then how to use an application more than passively? How to navigate to a different screen?

chess-5885Wearable augmented reality devices rely on vision to display content. There are already forays into voice navigation (along with infuriating buttons and swiping motions on the glasses themselves; some clever companies are utilizing Low Bluetooth Energy to pair companion smartphones or new devices like the Enimai “Nod” companion “ring” to activate in-app features. So what then – projectors, 3-D cameras for “finger tracking”? It’s hard to imagine a future where everyone is wearing AR glasses while obnoxiously yelling commands and waving their hands around in front of their faces or furiously trying to dial phone numbers on their hands.

Okay- so it’s not that difficult.

But what if we could bypass all of that? What if we could use camera technology to get even cleverer with reality interaction? Enter Thermal Touch – a technology that will enable interaction with nearly any object or surface.

Thermal Touch – Turning your whole world into a touchscreen

Pitch_picThermal Touch is a radical new approach to wearable headset graphical user interfaces (GUIs). It utilizes infrared cameras to register and track minute thermal imprints left by the heat signature of a finger. Touch your desk – you’re leaving imperceptible (and impermanent) heat maps each time your finger touches the surface. Combining a thermal camera with a normal camera, and developing AR tracking in conjunction with thermal heat tracking, Metaio can now turn anything into a touchscreen.

Trak Lord, Head of Metaio US Marketing, sat down with Daniel Kurz, lead Metaio R&D Engineer and creator of the Thermal Touch prototype, to talk about the future of human-computer interaction.

Daniel_KurzWhere did the idea for Thermal Touch originate?

It was happy coincidence that we got our hands on a thermographic camera and played around with it in the lab. Our R&D team had already been tasked with developing natural and intuitive ways of interacting with Augmented Reality applications when using head-mounted displays. After measuring the temperature of my coffee mug and my display, and after discovering interesting temperature patterns in my face, I noticed that wherever I left my hand resting on the desk, residual heat would become apparent in the thermal image. Brief experiments with different objects showed that this is not a unique property of my desk but most objects exhibit warm spots after touching them. The camera module further included a visible light camera, which allows recognizing and tracking objects in its field of view. Putting one and one together, this is how the idea arose that the combination of detecting touches in the thermal image and detecting and tracking the touched objects in the visible image would enable a natural way to interact with those objects and digital information associated to it – particularly for wearable headsets.

Can you describe how we built the prototype?

Our mobile prototype is based on a tablet PC to which we attached a combined thermal and visible light camera module. The fixture is simply a joist hanger I bought at the next do-it-yourself store. Our proof-of-concept software implementation is based on the Metaio SDK and therefore features the latest tracking capabilities for dealing with both planar and three-dimensional objects. It further provides the functionality to render virtual objects registered with the tracked objects. We had to extend the Metaio SDK to support capturing images from the thermographic camera and I developed a prototypical touch detection algorithm. All in all it wasn’t really that much work, because most pieces already existed in our SDK. The last thing to do was then creating some exemplary applications to demonstrate the versatile opportunities this technology offers in different use cases.

Ideally, what will Thermal Touch look like in the future? How many years are we from embedded infrared cameras?

This new way of interacting with Augmented Reality is clearly meant for wearable computers and head-mounted displays. These devices become increasingly important not only in the context of Augmented Reality, and as they do not have touch screens and they leave the hands free, our technology is a perfect fit. We keep working on improving our prototype in terms of robustness and latency and we are looking into how this fundamental approach can allow more advanced interaction techniques. For example, touching an object with different fingers might have different effects. Of course, it will take a couple of years until the first head-mounted devices will include a thermographic camera. But the current trend clearly is that these cameras become available at a small form factor and an affordable price. A mobile phone add-on enabling mobile thermal imaging will become available this year, and this is only the beginning. Once wearables are really being used ubiquitously, their hardware should be ready for Thermal Touch.

Though it may be years ahead in the future, embedding infrared cameras into wearable computing is not beyond the realm of possibility, especially in an industry that is still iterating on form factor and hardware, let alone the ideal graphical user interface.


Weekest Links – Beginning of June

June 2, 2014

I’m sooo fancy.

Auggie Award

The Metaio team wins the Auggie Award for Best AR Campaign at AWE 2014

Metaio | Junaio Recap

Thomas Alt (CEO, Metaio) Big Visions for the Interactive World – at AWE 2014:

Metaio’s Thermal Touch is an augmented reality interface designed for the future of wearable displays [psfk]

Thermal Touch, The AR Prototype, Will Fill Up The Google Glass Experience! [Load The Game]

Augmented Reality Assists in Medical Learning [Augmented Blog]

USC Annenberg Professor Robert Hernandez Will Be Speaking at AWE 2014 [Junaio Blog]

Thermal Touch can turn any surface into a tablet [Geek.com]

Metaio’s ‘Thermal Touch’ Technology Turns Everything Into A Touchscreen [Digital Trends]

‘Thermal Touch’ Tech Turns Any Surface Into a Touch Screen [PC Magazine]

Metaio unveils thermal imaging R&D for future use in wearable augmented reality headsets [Augmented Blog]

With ‘Thermal Touch’ tech, the world is your touchscreen [VentureBeat]

Metaio’s Thermal Touch And The Future Of Augmented Reality User Interfaces [TechCrunch]

Metaio unveils Thermal Touch technology for making user interfaces out of thin air [Gigaom]

Metaio is combining infrared and augmented reality technology to turn any surface into a touchscreen [TheNextWeb]

Metaio Thermal Touch uses hot fingers to make anything AR [SlashGear]

Smartglass interface turns any surface into a touchscreen using AR and fingertip heat [Engadget]

New Thermal Technology Turns the Entire World into a Touchscreen [Gizmodo]

InsideAR Goes Global: Metaio to Host Augmented Reality Conferences in Munich, Tokyo and Beijing [Augmented Blog]

Google Acquires Augmented Reality Translation Company Quest Visual [Augmented Blog]

Augmented Reality News

Leap Motion’s Gesture Control Finds Niche Uses In Medicine, Art and Augmented Reality [Singularity HUD]

Futuristic Helmets Use Smart Glasses, Augmented Reality [Discovery News]

Google Glasses Could Ding Big Retails Sears, JC Penny and More [The Street]

Forget vacuum cleaners, Dyson prototyped a Google Glass-like AR headset [TheNextWeb]

This augmented reality motorcycle helmet could save your life [Engadget]

Hands on with Meta Pro, the futuristic augmented reality glasses [The Sydney Morning Herald]

Sight for sore eyes: Augmented reality without the discomfort [Space Daily]

How augmented reality wants to help you shop [Network World]

Augmented reality: Where’s the venture capital? [VentureBeat]

Augmented Reality Moves to the Enterprise [Mobile Enterprise]

Google glass for war: The US Military funded smart helmet that can beam information to soldiers on the battlefield [DailyMail.co.uk]

Could augmented reality save the traditional wristwatch? [BBC News]

Upcoming Events

Webinar: Metaio Suite Introduction [Register Here]

InsideAR Tokyo [Register Here]

Pick of the Week

There’s been plenty of press around Metaio’s latest ‘Thermal Touch’ prototype. Anyone who visited the Metaio booth at AWE 2014 got to see it in action. If you were unable to attend AWE 2014 and want to learn more, be sure to look for the prototype at future Metaio events (such as insideAR), check out the articles above, and the video below.


InsideAR Goes Global: Metaio to Host Augmented Reality Conferences in Munich, Tokyo and Beijing

May 20, 2014

2014 is the year of InsideAR!

We invite the Metaio eco-system and the whole international AR community to join any of our three major AR events held in Germany, Japan and China. The second InsideAR Tokyo will be held July 8, and the first InsideAR Beijing will be held September 5. The 8th Annual InsideAR, the largest InsideAR event in the world, will return to Munich October 29-30.

city-Munich1Wearable eyewear and other technologies will be the focus of the conference this year, including the latest 3D optics and Augmented Reality applications. Attendees will receive insight from the companies on the forefront of the industry- brands and agencies actively working to bring AR to the masses. Last year, companies and Metaio partners like IKEA, Audi AG, Intel, SAP, McDonald’s, Mitsubishi Electric Heating & Cooling USA, Volkswagen, Vuzix, NVIDIA, and Imagination Technologies revealed insight into their research, collaborations and projects in the AR space.

IMG-locations-beijing2As China boasts the world’s most internet and smartphone users and Japan possesses a technology-hungry ever-increasing market, the decision to expand the core InsideAR event to these two countries was an easy one. Creative agencies all over the world are already moving their focus to emerging technology like AR. Both these satellite events will focus on “The Utilization of AR Technology On Wearable Devices”, including enterprise, marketing and maintenance examples.

With more than 800 participants, 45 speakers and more than 400 participating companies InsideAR 2013 in Munich was already an international success. We would like to continue this year and offer exciting keynotes, discussions and workshops to attendees of all three InsideAR conferences as well as extensive exhibitions where recent examples and future technologies can be tested directly.

More information on all three conferences, please visit www.insideAR2014.com.

Tickets are already available at http://www.insidear2014.com/register

For speaker and sponsor information, please contact insideAR@metaio.com

See the video for all the highlights from 2013 InsideAR in Munich!

Read the press release in Chinese

Read the press release in Japanese

 


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